Forests and human welfare.
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Forests and human welfare. by Tennessee Valley Authority

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Published by U.S. Govt. print. off. in [Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Forests and forestry -- United States.

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsSD143 .T4 1940
The Physical Object
Pagination46 p.
Number of Pages46
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6407391M
LC Control Number40026956
OCLC/WorldCa2752084

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With chapters covering the effects of human activities on succession patterns in now-protected Costa Rican forests; the intersection of gender and knowledge in African shea nut tree markets; and even the unexpectedly rich urban woodlands of Chicago, this book explores forests as places of significant human action, with complex institutions /5(2).   A state-of-the-art analysis of the global research on the topic of forests and human health, a key contribution of the book is its synthesis of material across both disciplines and nations.   Exploring the relationships between health, natural environments in general, and forests in particular, this groundbreaking book is the outcome of the European Union’s COST Action E39 ‘Forests, Trees and Human Health and Wellbeing’, and draws together work carried out over four years by scientists from 25 countries working in the fields. In book: Human Health and Forests: A Global Overview of Issues, Practice and Policy (pp) Chapter: Human health and forests: an overview In addition, there is more to human welfare than.

Forests are in decline, and the threats these outposts of nature face—including deforestation, degradation, and fragmentation—are the result of human culture. Or are they? This volume calls these assumptions into question, revealing forests’ past, present, and future conditions to be the joint products of a host of natural and cultural forces. Moreover, in many cases the coalescence of. Although forests cannot provide a panacea to air pollution, they do have an important role to play. According to a US study of tree and forest effects on air quality and human health, trees remove substantial amounts of pollution, with pollution removal being greatest in areas with the highest amount of tree cover.7 Interestingly, the study.   Tropical dry broadleaf forests, temperate broadleaf forests, Mediterranean forests, mangroves, and temperate grasslands are the most modified biomes. Dense human settlements, agricultural land uses, networks of infrastructure, and industrial activities dominate the more highly modified biomes. These lands are commonly subject to five or more. Forests provide additional goods and services that are important to both human welfare and to ecological integrity, including the control of erosion and water flows, and the cleansing of air and water of pollutants. These are all important forest values, although .

HUMAN HEALTH–FOREST LINKS. Forests do not have the same importance in the daily life of all people living in and near the forest; their importance varies along a continuum from hunter-gatherers to swidden farmers, to recent in-migrants, to agriculturists, to urban dwellers (see Figure).. Hunter-gatherers and swidden farmers depend on forests most fundamentally in terms of subsistence, health. Exploring the relationships between health, natural environments in general, and forests in particular, this groundbreaking book is the outcome of the European Union’s COST Action E39 ‘Forests, Trees and Human Health and Wellbeing’, and draws together work carried out over four years by scientists from 25 countries working in the fields. Abstract. Traditional medical and public health approaches to illness and health are among the successes of modern science. However, society today is faced with the increasing incidence of various forms of poor health related to modern lifestyles. The fact that natural forests and poverty are found in the same place in some areas of the world2 is no accident. Natural forests are home to human evolution and human populations that have lived there for millennia are at a relatively low level of socio-economic development. Moreover, migrant rural populations that colonise forested areas and.